The River Thames is fed by a vast network of small watercourses and streams that join to form the main tributaries of the river. These watercourses flow over 16,000 sq. km of land referred to as the Thames River Basin. The River Thames is an important water source, providing around two-thirds of London's drinking water. Phosphates and nitrates enter the river at numerous points across the whole water network and can harm ecosystems, sensitive plants and animals and increase toxic algae incidences. On 14th September Wild Oxfordshire, in partnership with The River Thame Conservation Trust, Earthwatch, Centre for Ecology & Hydrology and the Environment Agency are leading catchment partnerships across the Thames Basin and inviting the public to join forces to carry out a mass census of the levels of these pollutants at key points on the river systems.  

If you would like to take part in this major citizen science event to map and measure nutrient levels, visit Wild Oxfordshire's web site to find your local river catchment hosts or contact Hilary Philips at hilary@wildoxfordshire.org.uk

Visit the Environment Agency's Catchment Data Explorer to find out more about your local catchment. Results will be mapped on the Earthwatch water hub