FREE

Take a tour of the vibrant Docklands’ creative arts hub and riverside community at Trinity Buoy Wharf tucked between the Thames and Bow Creek. Visit historic buildings including the Grade II listed Chainstore built in 1864, London’s only lighthouse, experience unique sound installation Longplayer and Sculptor Andrew Baldwin’s kinetic work will be on display.

Site Manager John Burton will lead the tour of this amazing place to take in buildings old and new. Trinity Buoy Wharf is the Thameside site where all the buoys and markers for the River Thames were once made and repaired. The site was rescued from dereliction and now its lighthouse (the only one in the capital) overlooks a growing creative community.

Preserving the Grade II-listed warehouse and other historic buildings, the developers have constructed creative and artists' studios, offices and a riverside café from recycled shipping containers.  There is a great selection of kinetic sculptures around the site including Baby Aluna, Flood Tide and Tide Bell. English National Opera make all their props there, the Royal Drawing School have their Foundation Year Art School there and there are a host of other creative tenants.  The fleet of Thames Clippers is based there – at one of London's longest piers, which was built almost entirely from recycled materials.

Located on the site is nostalgic '40/50’s food joint, Fat Boys Diner, and what may be London's smallest museum, The Faraday Project.  Housed in a tiny wooden hut, it's devoted to the Victorian scientist Michael Faraday who conducted experiments into electric lighting in the lighthouse in the 1860’s.